4 Middle Grade Series to read with your kids

4 Middle Grade Series to Read with Your Kids

Reading with your kids is an amazing experience that will enrich both of your lives. It should be super fun. A lot can go wrong, though. It’s hard to find kid’s books that are both exciting enough to keep a kid’s attention, and not make you want to gouge your own eyes out.

Here are four series (and two stand alone books) that both you and your kids will love!

A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket

A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket

I know, I know, everyone is talking about these. I promise the rest of the list will be a little more obscure.

The series surrounds the Baudelaire children, who have recently lost their parents. They now bounce from guardian to guardian, while seemingly every aspect of their life goes awry.

These books are hilarious for adults and children alike. The kids are adventurous, intelligent kids (I think we can all agree we’d like our kids to see more protagonists like this). The antagonist, Count Olaf, is also just genuinely great.

The books are super short, and it’s a plus that the show just came out on Netflix. Finish the books, then watch it together! Compare and contrast the differences with your kids.

Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

Artemis Fowl II is a 12 year old criminal mastermind. The first book in the series entails his capturing a fairy and holding her ransom to exploit the Fairy People.

These are smart reads, I recommend them for kids in the 10-12 range. They are so fun, and you will love them too.

The covers are also gorgeous, if that matters to you. (No judgement; I appreciate a beautiful cover.)

The Secret Series by Pseudonymous Bosch

The Secret Series by Pseudonymous Bosch

I died the first time I stumbled upon these. No seriously. Pseudonymous Bosch. That kills me. (For everyone who is not a super art history nerd, Hieronymus Bosch was an old school, super weird painter.)

The Secret Series involves three kids in a secret society. Each book is centers around one of the senses. For instance, This Book Is Not Good For You is all about chocolate, which is obviously taste.

The 39 Clues by Rick Riordan (and others)

39 Clues by Rick Riordan

Everyone knows Riordan for the Percy Jackson series, which is also fantastic. This, I think, is aimed at kids a little younger.

The Cahill children, a brother and sister, have been invited to participate in a treasure hunt that their deceased grandmother explained in her will. The children race around the world, looking for the 39 clues.

These books are witty, which is fun for adults. The adventure, travelling, and treasure-hunting is fun for the kids.

 

And two stand-alone novels worth mentioning:

The Egypt Game by by Zilpha Keatley Snyder

The Egypt Game by by Zilpha Keatley Snyder

The Egypt Game is about two girls who realize they’re both obsessed with Ancient Egypt. The girls set up a meeting place, and hold the Egypt game.

I’m all for any book that can help a kid’s interest in a subject that could be considered educational. My kid did sooo much research on Ancient Egypt after having read this!

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

The Phantom Tolbooth by Norton Juster

Milo travels to the Kingdom of Wisdom, and goes on a quest to help two princesses, Rhyme and Reason.

I mean! SO fun. This book is so punny and delightful for everyone involved.

 

What About You?

What books do you like reading with your kids?



 

Fates by Lanie Bross

Fates: YA Urban Fantasy That Manages to Surprise

Fates by Lanie Bross

Published by Delacorte Press in 2014

Genre: Young Adult, Romance, Fantasy, Paranormal

Pages: 336

Strange Sweet Song by Adi Rule, Hexed by Michelle Krys, Archetype by M.D. Waters

This book was featured in my earlier post, Dollar Dollar Tree, Y’all! Yes, that’s right, I bought this book at the Dollar Tree. For a dollar. That makes me so. Effing. Happy.

To Give You a Quick Description:

She fell from her tranquil life in Pyralis Terra and found herself exiled to the human world. Her punishment? To make sure people’s fates unfold according to plan. Now, years later, Corinthe has one last assignment: kill Lucas Kaller. His death will be her ticket home.

But for the first time, Corinthe feels a tingle of doubt. It begins as a lump in her throat, then grows toward her heart, and suddenly she feels like she is falling all over again–this time for a boy she knows she can never have. Because it is written: one of them must live, and one of them must die. In a universe where every moment, every second, every fate has already been decided, where does love fit in?

Good, Solid Characters

Corinthe isn’t ultra likable, but as I’ve expressed before, that’s of little import to me. In my opinion, a fallen fate who doesn’t understand humanity probably wouldn’t be likable, so it’s spot on. She doesn’t feel or seem human, and she shouldn’t! Lucas is sweet, though, and easy to root for.

Another thing I liked is that because one of our narrators is tasked with killing the other, it makes it harder to say there is a clear cut antagonist. At least initially.

The Mythology Is Different and Interesting

It’s nice to read an Urban Fantasy from the last few years with no vampires, werewolves, angels, or demons. I liked the concept of a fallen fate, and her desperation to return home felt really authentic.

The Writing is Beautiful

The POV alternates in different chapters, and there is a definite vibe difference between the Corinthe chapters and the Lucas chapters. For a book with alternating POV, that’s really the main thing I’m looking for. I should know which narrator is talking by how they’re talking, and you definitely get that with this. I will say that due to long chapters, and my definite preference for Lucas-view chapters, I had a hard time getting into it at first. Because I didn’t really love Corinthe, it took me a while to get on board. It took about 75 pages for me to become interested, and probably 125 for me to be legit invested in the story.

I’d Recommend

Fates to anyone who digs YA with mythological elements.

Back of the novel Fates by Lanie Bross

What About You?

What’s your favorite Urban Fantasy?

 

*Note: My reviews are full of opinions. I may love a book. May want to marry it like the kid in the commercial for Peanut Butter Crunch (1999 was a great year for cereal and commercials, look it up). I may say a book is the best thing to happen to me since I started shaving my big toe. None of these things mean it is objectively good. I recognize that. Many times throughout my life, I have given a book I swore to be a life-changer to a friend/boyfriend/girlfriend/husband/vampire. Shaking, quietly weeping, I’d hand it (and my heart) over. Only to find out several weeks later that for them the book was good, maybe even great, but not the life-giving, soul-renewing magic I’d purported. You may not like a book I recommend. Sue me.

**Please don’t sue me, I just write here.